An Operations and Maintenance Information Open System Alliance

Joint Working Group Boosts Open Enterprise Integration Standards for Operations and Maintenance Applications

The Instrumentation Systems and Automation Society (ISA), MIMOSA (An Operations and Maintenance Open Systems Alliance) and OPC Foundation (OPC) announce a significant new collaboration to develop interoperable open solutions spanning from the factory floor through the enterprise.

The three organizations have agreed to establish a Joint Working Group tasked with determining how to co-ordinate their various standards development efforts. The objective is to simplify the development of interoperable Operations & Maintenance (O&M) systems, equipment and software incorporating productized integration with each other and with other enterprise systems. Open integration requirements for applications such as Manufacturing Execution Systems, Operations Data Historians, Human Machine Interfaces, Enterprise Resource Planning, Enterprise Asset Management and Condition Based Maintenance will be addressed by the effort. Manufacturers, integrators and end-users of such systems are all expected to benefit from this collaboration.

Until now, the three organizations have been working independently to help establish consensus-driven standards with some informal interaction between their various members. Recently, OPC and MIMOSA formalized their collaboration, resulting in this week's OpenO&M industry initiative being demonstrated for the first time at ISA EXPO 2003 in the OPC foundation booth.

The collaboration will help vendors to successfully use the existing standards of MIMOSA, ISA and OPC to build more comprehensive interoperable products. The joint working group will also establish a basis for coordinating on-going and future standards development efforts, enabling end-users to build systems that exchange data transformed into "information" between the factory floor and the enterprise. MIMOSA and ISA SP95 define information and process models for information flow, essentially defining the "what", while OPC defines the "how" to move the data and information.

Keith Unger, ISA SP95 Committee Chair said: "Establishing this collaborative effort will help suppliers and end users by reducing the time it takes to establish open standards in integration between operations, maintenance and the overall enterprise. I look forward to working with OPC and MIMOSA to rapidly establish an effective and open integration standard."

OPC Foundation President Tom Burke said: "We've come a long way since OPC was just a way for HMI to see into someone else's system. Today, not only do we have OPC solutions for just about any automation application, but we've moved into services-based connectivity founded on our unified architecture. Our latest XML-enabled solutions allow equipment and systems to be monitored over the Internet as information rather than raw data, facilitating easier Operations and Maintenance Management across the global environment. We can provide the 'how' for this increasingly sophisticated marketplace in support of the 'what' being defined by MIMOSA and ISA SP95."

Alan Johnston, MIMOSA President said: "I am really excited about this opportunity to improve the standards development process for our industry. While there are many separate groups seeking to establish standards, I believe collaboration is the key to being effective. By working together, I believe our three organizations can help each other to develop and propagate more useful consensus standards that will interoperate by design."

The Instrumentation Systems and Automation Society (ISA), MIMOSA (An Operations and Maintenance Open Systems Alliance) and OPC Foundation (OPC) announce a significant new collaboration to develop interoperable open solutions spanning from the factory floor through the enterprise.
The three organizations have agreed to establish a Joint Working Group tasked with determining how to co-ordinate their various standards development efforts. The objective is to simplify the development of interoperable Operations & Maintenance (O&M) systems, equipment and software incorporating productized integration with each other and with other enterprise systems. Open integration requirements for applications such as Manufacturing Execution Systems, Operations Data Historians, Human Machine Interfaces, Enterprise Resource Planning, Enterprise Asset Management and Condition Based Maintenance will be addressed by the effort. Manufacturers, integrators and end-users of such systems are all expected to benefit from this collaboration.
Until now, the three organizations have been working independently to help establish consensus-driven standards with some informal interaction between their various members. Recently, OPC and MIMOSA formalized their collaboration, resulting in this week's OpenO&M industry initiative being demonstrated for the first time at ISA EXPO 2003 in the OPC foundation booth.
The collaboration will help vendors to successfully use the existing standards of MIMOSA, ISA and OPC to build more comprehensive interoperable products. The joint working group will also establish a basis for coordinating on-going and future standards development efforts, enabling end-users to build systems that exchange data transformed into "information" between the factory floor and the enterprise. MIMOSA and ISA SP95 define information and process models for information flow, essentially defining the "what", while OPC defines the "how" to move the data and information.
Keith Unger, ISA SP95 Committee Chair said: "Establishing this collaborative effort will help suppliers and end users by reducing the time it takes to establish open standards in integration between operations, maintenance and the overall enterprise. I look forward to working with OPC and MIMOSA to rapidly establish an effective and open integration standard."
OPC Foundation President Tom Burke said: "We've come a long way since OPC was just a way for HMI to see into someone else's system. Today, not only do we have OPC solutions for just about any automation application, but we've moved into services-based connectivity founded on our unified architecture. Our latest XML-enabled solutions allow equipment and systems to be monitored over the Internet as information rather than raw data, facilitating easier Operations and Maintenance Management across the global environment. We can provide the 'how' for this increasingly sophisticated marketplace in support of the 'what' being defined by MIMOSA and ISA SP95."
Alan Johnston, MIMOSA President said: "I am really excited about this opportunity to improve the standards development process for our industry. While there are many separate groups seeking to establish standards, I believe collaboration is the key to being effective. By working together, I believe our three organizations can help each other to develop and propagate more useful consensus standards that will interoperate by design."